Our Blog

April is National Facial Protection Month

April 1st, 2020

The Importance of Facial Protection

Americans from all walks of life should mark April as National Facial Protection Month on their calendars. The American Association of Pediatric Dentistry, Academy for Sports Dentistry, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons have combined forces to sponsor this annual campaign, which aims to educate and remind us of the importance of protecting our face and teeth against impacts and injuries.

Wearing a helmet can save your life and prevent devastating physical damage in a variety of situations, from playing football to riding a bicycle. According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, helmets reduce the risk of various head injuries by as much as 85 percent. Whether helmet laws apply in your area or not, Dr. Margaret Miller, DDS and our team at Childrens Dental Clinic want you to make sure you and your loved ones wear helmets with the appropriate safety ratings for specific activities. (A sticker on or inside the helmet will usually indicate this rating.) Helmets can also help save your teeth if they come with an attached faceguard, an essential addition for football players and others involved in contact sports.

Preventing Dental Injuries

A mouthguard can protect you against a variety of dental injuries, such as cracked, broken, or knocked-out teeth. The American Dental Association states that mouthguards play an essential role in preventing up to 200,000 dental injuries each year, and many states mandate their use for sports activities such as football and hockey. The Academy for Sports Dentistry warns, however, that these mouthguards must be custom-fitted as precisely as possible to prove effective. Have a professional-quality mouthguard molded and fitted by our team at Childrens Dental Clinic for better protection than a generic store-bought or “boil-and-bite” variety can offer. These cheaper versions tend to wear out quickly, interfere with proper breathing, and provide uneven degrees of cushion against impacts. Always have a fresh mouthguard fitted for each new sports season.

Choose the right combination of helmet, faceguard, and mouthguard to protect your teeth and face this April, and tell your friends to do the same! To learn more about mouthguards, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Margaret Miller, DDS, please give us a call at our convenient De Pere office!

Happy St. Patrick's Day

March 17th, 2020

Happy March everyone! We love getting festive in our office and St. Patrick’s Day is certainly no exception. We love to wear green on St. Patrick's Day and Dr. Miller usually hangs 2 flags; one to represent Ireland and one from County Kerry, where Dr. Miller’s relatives reside.

At home Dr. Miller celebrates by making corned beef, cabbage, and baking Irish soda bread with her mom's family recipe. Once it’s done baking we like to serve it warm with butter, yummmm! Dr. Miller gathers with her family to eat and talk about their trips to Ireland and all the beautiful people and places they have visited. Most of their stories have to do with experiences staying at bed and breakfasts over the years.

This spring we are hoping to complete our office remodeling project and keep working at our goal of being a "paperless" and chart-less office! Going green has become very important to us. Spring is also a great time to be more active outside. Now that the weather is warmer and the days are longer you can find us going for a walk or a bike ride when we aren’t at the office.

New habits do not just have to start on January 1st. Once the holidays are over there is usually more time to focus on our health and lifestyle choices. Desserts may be delicious but candy and sweets are loaded with sugar, as well as carbohydrates (watch out for some of your favorite snacks like chips, crackers too) and soda. The sugar is broken down to acids which eat away at your tooth's enamel and cause tooth decay or cavities. Dr. Miller highly recommends trying to lower your intake of sugar.

At Children's Dental Clinic of Green Bay we are so lucky to have great patients and parents that always keep us informed on how their families are doing. When we hear we are doing a great job and their kids love to come to the dentist, we can't help but smile, too! We couldn’t do what we do without you!

Wishing you and yours a Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Good Nutrition Leads to Healthy Mouths

March 4th, 2020

At Childrens Dental Clinic, we know the most common oral health diseases are tooth decay and periodontal disease (or gum disease), and both are among the easiest to prevent. One of the most common ways we recommend to boost your oral health is by improving your diet, because you (and your mouth) truly are what you eat. A healthy diet can lead to a healthy mouth and body, while an unhealthy diet can lead to the exact opposite.

The Role Nutrition Plays

While diet is not the only factor that leads to periodontal disease, studies suggest the disease may be more severe among patients whose diets lack essential nutrients. Poor diets will generally lead to a weaker immune system, leaving your body susceptible to all kinds of ailments, including periodontal disease.

A Well-Balanced Approach

There is no “magic” diet that we can recommend to improve your oral health, but the most important thing is to seek a well-balanced approach in your eating. While fad diets that emphasize one food group over another may help you lose weight in the short-term, they probably will not provide all the nutrients your body needs in the long run.

Meals should include a balance of lean meats or other healthy protein sources, colorful fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats. Foods containing substantial amounts of sugar and salt should be consumed in moderation.

Soda and Sugar: A Dangerous Duo

Millions of gallons of soda are consumed every day in America, but sipping a cold soft drink can be very harmful to your teeth. Many of these beverages wear down the enamel that protects the teeth, which weakens and even destroys them over time. The American Beverage Association estimates that soft drinks account for almost 30 percent of all drink consumption in the U.S., averaging an annual total of about 50 gallons per person (up from only 20 gallons in the 1970s). For healthy teeth and a healthy body overall, try to limit your soda intake.

Sugar is another ubiquitous treat in our daily lives. When we eat sugar, naturally occurring bacteria in our mouths convert it to acids that attack tooth enamel. Consuming too much sugar can swiftly lead to tooth decay, cavities, and gum diseases like gingivitis. Most people do not even realize how much sugar they consume each day. It’s important to limit your daily sugar intake by reading the labels of all the food you eat, and sticking with natural food sources that are low in sugar, especially ones that minimize added sugar, such as fruits and vegetables.

If you have questions about your diet and how it may be affecting your oral health, talk to Dr. Margaret Miller, DDS about it. See you soon!

Steer clear of that candy!

February 26th, 2020

At Childrens Dental Clinic, we know how tempting candy can sometimes be on our sweet tooth, but it’s important to remember that every candy and sugary treat you consume elevates your risk of developing tooth decay, which can break down your teeth.

While not all bad in moderation, when eaten in excess, candy can lead to big problems, especially if good oral hygiene habits are not followed. We have a few helpful tips if you just can’t stay away from all those treats:

1. Consume candy and other sweets during meals when your saliva can help neutralize the acids that are found in some candies, especially the sour variety.

2. Avoid sticky or hard candies, which can stay in your mouth longer than you think, resulting in acids being constantly exposed to your teeth. That leads to cavities and tooth decay.

3. Make sure the water you drink is fluoridated. Water that is fluoridated has been shown to help prevent cavities.

4. Make sure to maintain your daily oral hygiene habits. This includes brushing twice a day, and flossing at least once.

5. Visit our office twice a year for regular dental checkups and cleanings with Dr. Margaret Miller, DDS. During your visit, we can help catch problems such as cavities early to reduce the effects they have on your teeth, as well as give you tips for improving your oral health.

We hope these tips have helped! To learn more about cavity prevention, or to schedule your next visit at our convenient De Pere office, please give us a call!

534 Redbird Cir
De Pere, WI 54115
(920) 336-4002